Choose A Custom Work Below To Donate
  1. Zarah Peterson
    For Your Donation
    I will be doing watercolours and ink on paper, simple acrylic works on canvas and oil paintings with a distinctively classical style yet painted with a looser, more contemporary hand. My work is intensely emotionally charged, so I’ll chat with you and learn some of your thoughts, feelings and ideas to incorporate them into the piece. When I am doing portraiture I will usually paint from a photograph but in some cases I would be willing to have you sit for me so I can paint your portrait on the spot. I work in a variety of styles so the possibilities for my pieces are vast.
    $50
    8.5"x11"
    watercolour w/ ink, on paper
    $100
    20"x28"
    watercolour w/ ink, on paper
    or 12"x12"
    acrylic painting on canvas
    $200
    24"x24"
    watercolour w/ ink, on paper
    or 18"x18"
    acrylic painting on canvas
    $350
    36"x36"
    watercolour w/ ink, on paper
    or 32"x32"
    acrylic painting on canvas
    $500
    48"x48"
    watercolour w/ ink, on paper
    or 40"x40"
    acrylic painting on canvas
    or 12"x12"
    signature style oil painting on canvas
    $1000
    60"x60"
    watercolour or acrylic painting, on paper or canvas
    or 24"x24"
    signature style oil painting, on canvas
    or a combination of smaller works
    and a "meet and greet", coffee with Zarah to discuss the work
    $1500
    72"x72"
    watercolour or acrylic painting, on paper or canvas
    or 36"x36"
    signature style oil painting, on canvas
    or a combination of smaller works
    and a "meet and greet", coffee with Zarah to discuss the work
    About Zarah
    As a person living in and absorbing the goings on of our modern time, I sometimes struggle to know why I was given an artist’s mind. I wonder, “What can I do to change the world as an artist, and how can I actively participate in fixing the wrongs of humanity?" When I find myself caught in this struggle I try to remind myself that as artists we have the power to make people feel things and think things very deeply, and in a special way: by stimulating their imaginations. The mind is a place where the spark of change begins and to shift thought is a thing more beautiful than art, and the power of art can lend itself to society by encouraging this all important thing - progression.
  2. Elly Smallwood
    For Your Donation
    I do portraits of people, portraits of their faces. I prefer something emotional. I can work from photos, or if you’re willing to sit for a few hours I can do it from life. I can capture something very raw and emotional. Something that you’ll react to emotionally.
    $350
    8.5"x11"
    acrylic & watercolour w/ink, on paper
    $500
    18"x24"
    acrylic & watercolour w/ink, on paper
    $750
    18"x24"
    acrylic & watercolour w/ink, on canvas
    $1000
    18"x24"
    acrylic & watercolour w/ink, on canvas, from life
    About Elly
    I graduated from OCAD - 4 years of drawing and painting. I’m originally from Ottawa, and I’ve been painting for most of my life. I’ve gotten really into portraits over the last few years. I’m brainching a little more into figurative work as well. I work mostly with acrylic and oil, with watercolours.
  3. Brian Barrer
    For Your Donation
    All my images are Brian Barrer originals. I transfer them to wood panels, and paint over top. Together we can choose a theme or a picture from my collection, and decide on a mood for the piece. Some themes I’ve worked with in the past are people, birds, balloons, environmental recovery, and underwater.
    $500
    8"x8"
    exclusive, original work, on wood panel
    $750
    10"x10"
    exclusive, original work, on wood panel
    $1000
    24"x24"
    exclusive, original work, on wood panel
    $1500
    36"x36"
    exclusive, original work, on wood panel
    About Brian
    Breaking down the meaning of images and assembling new contexts is the basis for my work. Since the early 1990s I have used mixed media and photographic assemblage to express an ever evolving imagination. These often take the form of vibrant aesthetic experiences that fuse playful abstractions with the intensified realism of captured images. Artwork begins as a singular process with the object of connecting with others. The removal of collective barriers and the dismantling of our perceptions allow expressions from within to find this commonality. While the end result of my work offers discourse and a large degree of interpretive latitude, my hope is to share with the viewer a sense of creative connection and imaginative exploration.
  4. Michael Pietcarlo
    For Your Donation
    I am fascinated by forsaken spaces: structures whose longevity has defied their purpose; sites reclaimed by nature, time, and the boundaries of ruin. I discover and photograph these places in reverence of their former significance, to uncover the beauty that remains beneath the decay. I’m really interested to shoot someone in one of these places, to explore the juxtaposition of life/renewal and decay/abandonment. We can choose a site together, and you can be part of the work.
    $500
    an exclusive shoot and digital images
    $750
    an exclusive shoot and digital images
    and 12"x18"
    exclusive print, on plexiglass
    $1000
    an exclusive shoot and digital images
    and 18"x24"
    exclusive print, on plexiglass
    About Michael
    I employ a practice akin to found art, appropriating found places in a similar manner. I strive to capture the scenes faithfully and undisturbed; my technique favors wide-angle perspectives and natural lighting to convey vicarious presence. Utilizing the scale of the final prints, my hope is to evoke a sense of distressed grandeur and intimate emptiness. Any image manipulation is done with intent and obvious effect to communicate a particular visual statement. Ultimately, I endeavor to document spaces that were once purposefully occupied by multitudes, but now only serve to occupy the imagination of the observer. Perhaps my own struggles with mortality are partially appeased by demonstrating artistry in dereliction and purpose in obsolescence.
  5. Graham Van Houten
    For Your Donation
    I can draw a portrait or a scratchboard from any type of photo you can give me. I can also make you an illustration, something a little more concept-heavy, from an idea that you have. These drawings will have an element of roughness and crudeness, and my hand will be very evident in the work. For higher donations, I’ll do a workshop for you and even a few of your friends, where I’ll provide materials and you’ll be able to take home all of the work we do.
    $150
    5"x7"
    custom portrait, on clayboard panel
    $200
    5"x7"
    2 custom portraits, on clayboard panel
    $350
    8"x10"
    custom portrait or concept drawing, on clayboard panel
    $500
    12"x12"
    custom portrait or concept drawing, on clayboard panel
    or 11"x14"
    custom portrait or concept drawing, on clayboard panel
    $700
    a 3 hr. workshop, for 1 at my studio, materials provided
    $1000
    16"x20"
    custom portrait or concept drawing, on clayboard panel
    or 11"x14"
    custom portrait or concept drawing, on clayboard panel
    $1500
    a 3 hr. workshop, for you and 4 friends at my studio, materials provided
    About Graham
    For as long as I can remember I have been drawing. Whether I was copying out comic books or doodling monsters on my desk, I was rarely without a pencil in hand. I attended The Ontario College of Art and Design, graduating with a B.F.A. in Drawing and Painting in 2007, and have been maintaining a practice ever since and continuing my growth as an artist, discovering Scratchboard (my continuing medium of choice) in the process. In 2012 I completed a Post-graduate certificate in Illustration, focusing my love of drawing on a very demanding but rewarding field of art.
  6. NeithSa
    For Your Donation
    I work spiritually and psychically. I’ll take a thought, a feeling, some colours or just your name and paint your vibrations, etherically based on the theme. You can even sing me a song and I’ll paint from that. I work with plaster and modelling paste, and special powdered pigments. I build a up a base with plaster and layer the paint over top, and imagery just begins to appear as I go.
    $50
    8"x10"
    name work, on canvas
    $100
    12"x18"
    custom work, on canvas, from a feeling, thought, or song
    $200
    20"x28"
    custom work, on canvas, from a feeling, thought, or song
    $350
    24"x36"
    custom work, on canvas, from a feeling, thought, or song
    $500
    36"x40"
    custom work, on canvas, from a feeling, thought, or song
    $1000
    48"x48"
    custom work, on canvas, from a feeling, thought, or song
    and a small spirit wand, hand made by NeithSa
    and a spiritual consultation
    $1500
    48"x48"
    custom work, on canvas, from a feeling, thought, or song
    OR a painting & healing party, with custom live 12"x18" paintings for everyone
    and a large spirit staff, hand made by NeithSa
    and a healing session
    About NeithSa
    NeithSa is my Sacred name. It means the spider weaves the original source for all to enjoy their happiness. The spider also weaves another net, to catch any who might fall into her arms. This is the way to bliss. I come from a long line of fairies and elves. I love magic! I don’t learn in linear-mental-traditional ways. Instead, I hear and see the Spirit. I visualize things before they appear. I have been like this, and not forgotten, since I was a child.
  7. Caroline Kings
    For Your Donation
    I do image transfers using a self-levelling gel, taking a printed image and transferring the ink onto a canvas and layering with acrylic paint. We can choose an image together, or you can provide one. For larger pieces, I can also incorporate found objects, yours or mine. Door knockers, zippers, feathers, drawings, poems, photos, coins and keys are just some of the types of objects to be found on my paintings. I like to paint abstract and figurative work. We can talk and decide what story your piece will tell.
    $50
    8"x10"
    drawing, on paper
    $100
    30"x30"
    (or smaller) drawing, on paper
    or 12"x12"
    abstract or figure, on canvas in acrylic, featuring one photo
    $200
    24"x24"
    abstract or figure, on canvas in acrylic, featuring one photo and one found object
    $350
    30"x30"
    abstract or figure, on canvas in acrylic, featuring two photos and two found objects
    $500
    40"x40"
    abstract or figure, on canvas in acrylic, featuring any photos and any found objects
    $1000
    50"x50"
    abstract or figure, on canvas in acrylic, featuring any photos and any found objects
    or a combination of smaller works
    and a "meet and greet", coffee with Caroline to discuss the work
    $1500
    60"x60"
    abstract or figure, on canvas in acrylic, featuring any photos and any found objects
    or a combination of smaller works
    and a vegan dinner, home cooked, at a location of your choice
    $2000
    60"x60"
    abstract or figure, on canvas in acrylic, featuring any photos and any found objects
    or a combination of smaller works
    and a vegan dinner for 5, home cooked, at a location of your choice
    About Caroline
    Caroline uses anything from dry walling to image transferring to glazes and layers of tissue paper for her collages. She has been creating her artwork in such a way since attending Centennial College for fine arts, where she won the award for Entrepreneurship and Initiative for curating her own art show while still attending school. She has also won Juror’s choice in Scarborough Arts BIG ART BOOK in 2012. She is currently accepting commissions and working on getting involved in event and film catering while coming up with the thesis for her next painting series. Another talent of Caroline’s is her knowledge of vegan cuisine – after being a vegan for four years she has learned how to maintain a well balanced, nutritious and healthy diet without animal products. She began working as a professional vegan cook over a year and a half ago.
  8. James Okore
    For Your Donation
    For your donation I want to focus on portraiture and custom works done in oils and pastels. My inspiration comes from reflecting on the past, up until the present. I’d love to talk with you and determine what look and feel are right for you and your space. Generally I focus on realism, but I’d be happy to work in abstract or expressive modes. I can work from a photo, or from an idea.
    $50
    11"x14"
    conté drawing on cartridge paper or newsprint
    $100
    12"x18"
    conté drawing, on cartridge paper or newsprint
    or 11"x14"
    pastel, on bristol board
    or 10"x12"
    oil portrait, on canvas
    $200
    20"x28"
    conté drawing, on cartridge paper or newsprint
    or 24"x24"
    pastel, on bristol board
    or 16"x16"
    oil portrait, on canvas
    $350
    30"x30"
    pastel, on bristol board
    or 18"x20"
    oil portrait, on canvas
    $500
    36"x36"
    pastel, on bristol board
    or 20"x24"
    oil portrait, on canvas
    $750
    36"x36"
    oil portrait, on canvas
    and a "meet and greet", coffee with James to discuss the work
    $1000
    40"x40"
    oil portrait, on canvas
    and a "meet and greet", coffee with James to discuss the work
    $1500
    48"x48"
    oil portrait, on canvas
    and James will paint live, with you, at a location of your choice
    About James
    I typically work in oil paints, it is a medium I have fallen in love with. The thing that I like about oils is that they don’t dry as fast. This gives me more time to work on a painting, if I need to do a bit of blending. In general I like to focus on people as the subject matter. I grew up very shy and timid, and most of the time I was observing people and their behaviors. I would look at the personality of someone, and how they would interact with others. Over time, I began to get a bit more social. But I have always been interested in capturing the essence of people in my work (whether portraiture, or figuratively).
  9. Michael Rachlis
    For Your Donation
    I paint with oils. My practice is motivated by a desire to understand the great linage the portrait painting carries while trying to explore new and assertive methods of gestural paint application. So much of my work is about identity, so I would like to meet you and discuss our ideas over a coffee or tea to make the best piece for both of us.
    $50
    8"x10"
    sketch, selected from my existing works
    $100
    8"x10"
    custom sketch, in ink, graphite, and charcoal on paper
    or 2 sketches selected from my existing works
    $200
    10"x14"
    paint study, on mylar, from my existing works
    $350
    10"x14"
    custom paint study, on mylar
    and 8"x10"
    paper work, selected from my existing works
    $500
    10"x14"
    custom paint studies, 2, on mylar
    or 10"x14"
    paint studies, any 3, from my existing works
    or a combination of smaller works
    $1000
    24"x36"
    custom oil painting or portrait, on mylar
    or a combination of smaller works
    and a "meet and greet", coffee with Michael to discuss the works
    $1500
    36"x48"
    custom oil painting or portrait, on mylar
    or a combination of smaller works
    and a "meet and greet", coffee with Michael to discuss the works
    and a studio visit & tour, while the work is in progress
    About Michael
    Born and raised in Toronto i have been making art consistently since i was inspired by the graffiti in my neighborhood as a child. At this point painting has just become a part of my life that i cannot function without. My work aims to exist in balance of opposing ideas, between control and chaos, admiration and condemnation.
  10. Anne Cavanagh
    For Your Donation
    I will capture a memory through a work of art. I will render a portrait in graphite that captures the personality and essense of the subject. For your work of art, we can meet and choose a photo from your collection to use as reference.

    For higher donations, in addition to a custom work of art, I’ll provide a portrait drawing workshop for you (or up to 4 students) at my studio in Peterborough. Materials and light refreshments provided.
    $500
    11"x14"
    custom graphite portrait, on illustration board
    $750
    16"x20"
    custom graphite portrait, on illustration board
    $1000
    11"x14"
    custom graphite portrait, on illustration board
    and a 6 hr. private portrait workshop, materials provided
    $1500
    16"x20"
    custom graphite portrait, on illustration board
    and a 6 hr. private portrait workshop, materials provided
    About Anne
    Anne Cavanagh studied visual art in the United States, France and England. At the post-secondary level, she combined her loves of art and science, obtaining a B.A. with a concentration in pre-medical illustration. She currently lives, and is an avid member of the arts community, in her hometown of Peterborough, Ontario. When she is not creating in her studio, she can be found teaching art at various locations throughout the Peterborough area, running the trails of Jackson Park or spending time with her family.
  11. Want To Donate?
  12. Additional Offers
    $1000
    A VIP dinner with one of our artists (your choice, from those participating) and a custom work of art
    $1500
    A VIP dinner table with 3 of our artists (your choice, from those participating), as well as a guest of your own, and, either a custom work by each artist or a large work done live by all 3 artists at the event of your choice.
    $2000
    Have an entire wall in your home or office done with a custom mural by one of the fabulous Artists of the
    Movement (your choice, from those participating)
  13. Thank You!



  1. Donation Amounts

    • $50 - $500 – Works of art and a small consultation (see below for details)
    • Over $500 – Works of art and interactive art experiences (see below)
    • $1000 – A VIP dinner with one of our artist (your choice, from those participating), and a custom work of art.
    • $1500 - A VIP dinner table with 3 of our artists (your choice, from those participating), as well as a guest of your own, and, EITHER a custom work by each artist OR a large work done live by all 3 artists at the event of your choice.
    • $2000 – Have an entire wall in your home or office done with a custom mural by one of the fabulous artists of the Movement (your choice, from those participating).

     

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  2. The Tundra Art Project

    We are all familiar with and embrace the history of the Inuit vision, as illustrated in the beauty of their art. Their vision of the transformation of animal to human and vice versa as subject matter in their work has intrigued me for many years.

    Now there is another transformation taking place, that of the land. My purpose in this project is to explore that environmental transformation and how I interpret it with Southern visual language.

    I myself feel a distinct disconnect from the effects of the changing global climate on the North, where it is the most dramatic. Here in a growing city in the South I do notice a change, but the effect on my daily life is negligible. I’m Canadian, and should by definition be sensitive to what North means other than a point on a compass. This is indeed virgin territory for me.

    I strongly feel that this is a perfect, albeit lamenting time to look at the North with a visually examining eye. We need a visual record of the environmental revolution taking place, its effect upon the land and all that walk upon it, the ocean and all that lives in it, and the sky and all that flies through it.

    It is essential that an awareness of the changing North is seen by us in the South from as many angles as possible. We have all seen reports in the media. People like Dr. David Suzuki have been instrumental in cultivating that awareness. I see the task at hand  as taking the awareness into the realm of the creative: to visually portray the effect our progress is having upon a place that is as ancient as the earth itself; to see the effect upon the human and animal inhabitants that have lived with and of the land since time immemorial.

    The scope of The Tundra Project shall have two facets. The first will comprise the creation of large scale paintings made out on the land. The paintings will provide both of our cultures an opportunity to see the North as it is changing with Southern visual language. The second will be the making of a documentary video to chronicle the process of the project, and those bearing witness to it as well as their reflections upon it.

    The process of the project will entail propping the working surface of full sheets of plywood (8’ x 4’) against built easel structures out on the land facing the plain air subject. Besides the painted imagery I will also employ a router to carve out dream images that relate to the painted composition, as I have done in past paintings. The paint itself, (oil) will be applied using a number of brushes, scrapers, rollers and whatever else seems fitting for each piece.

    In keeping with past works the resulting pieces will neither be photo real nor abstract but a distinctive hybrids. As far as how many paintings will be executed I will only know after the beginning of the series, but I do plan on taking approximately 2 months to complete the project.

    I plan on employing an Inuit film maker to chronicle the journey. The film maker will have complete creative freedom as I want the project to be witnessed through Northern eyes. This element is critical to the successful marriage of North and South. There would also be a marriage of languages mixing of both Inuktitut and English, a further enhancement of the cultural bridge.

    As I have never been to our youngest province, I’m sure there will be some tactical hurdles to get over. Finding a studio to store the work and supplies is one that immediately comes to mind. Not to mention a place to live for 6 to 8 weeks.

    My research so far is bearing some early fruit as I have been making contact with some very helpful people in Rankin Inlet. Already I have been in contact with one possible film maker for the documentary. There is of course a lot more work to be done.


    __________

    by Kurt Rostek
    www.kurtscanadianart.com, The Artword Blog
    kurt@thesocialartmovement.com

     


  3. The Art of Theft - How the Black Market is Affecting Investment in Art

    From our series on COLLECTING ART.

    Image: reconstruction of the theft of Munch’s The Scream; BBC Art Crime series.

     

    Attention millionaires all over the world – and fellow optimists still striving for our first million: are you tired of carrying around that full wallet and looking for something to invest in? Or at least looking to just keep your money safe? Look no further than the ever-expanding art market! You get a great return on your investment when the piece appreciates in value; beautiful artwork to display around your home; a conversation piece for your next soirée; and maybe even a face-to-face meeting with another fellow art enthusiast – the art thief!

    Over the years, the black market has become a lucrative one for art thieves and organized criminals to conduct business. Most recently, Egyptian antiquities are the most popular collectibles to enter this market. Although the annual turnover of stolen cultural property cannot ever really be calculated exactly in dollar values, since this line of work is not exactly legal by any nation’s definition of business practises, international authorities like Interpol and UNESCO estimate that this number is well into the billions of dollars. Once introduced to the market, items will move quickly in and back out; transferring hands a number of times.

    And it isn’t just art auctions or institutions they go missing from. A large majority of art passing through the black market is stolen from personal, private collections.

    Art to artists and art enthusiasts alike may be priceless, but the trend is such that, today, many wealthy people have turned to what is being called ‘investments of passion” by investing big bucks into art. Some of the more well-known pieces are being bought at seriously hefty price tags, with Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” leading the pack and making history by being sold for nearly US$120 million at Sotheby’s last year. This, obviously, makes selling stolen pieces, especially ones so valuable, even more rewarding to thieves.

    Fun fact: “The Scream” has been a target, and recovered, from several elaborate and high-profile heists in the past. Extra points if you can tell me where and when.

    The aim of investing in art for many of the world’s wealthy is, I’m told, to store millions – if not billions – of dollars every year in what is perceive to be a low-risk investment. But proven time and time again, even this contingency plan of keeping safe money can backfire. And backfire it does, every time a we see a multi-million dollar piece of artwork stolen.

    Criminals follow the art market and international art auctions closely. They’re also willing to follow the dollar anywhere in the world if it results in a big payday for them. And it may not even be criminals who’ve thoroughly planned elaborate and movie-quality heists. Insiders, with access to valuable art pieces or entire collections, have joined their fellow heist-planners by committing “crimes of opportunity” and taking their chances by channelling sales through the black market.

    So what happens to a piece of art after it is stolen?

    More on that next time.


    __________

    by Olta Meleqi
    @OltaMeleqi on Twitter
    olta@thesocialartmovement.com

     


  4. Parenting, Artistically Speaking

    From our series on APPRECIATING ART

    If you feel as strongly about the education of children as I do then you might agree that there is work to be done on the art front in general. 

    I’m speaking primarily about public education, where art has been squeezed into a templated minimalized curriculum to simplify assessment.  It is taught as a subject minus the creativity. Unless, as is often the case, the teacher involved is passionate about their work.

    So if you are a parent, what do you do about it

    One would hope that long before a child registers for school they have experienced art and design in their lives by way of enlightened parents. Few us have been raised among artists or gallery owners but that should not matter. Parents who wish the best possible education for their children will have memberships to the galleries, and attend art shows, symphonies, and artesian festivals with their kids in addition to enrolling them in sports clubs. 

    It is never too early to have conversations about art

    A few things you can do at home:

    • Buy real art and show it in every room in your living space
    • Take your family to galleries, big ones and small
    • Pick up the catalogues and talk about what you see
    • Use the language of art and design routinely
    • Select games and puzzles with creative and artistic content

    The Starry Night Master Kit from Mastermind is one of many toys to teach kids about art.

    You get the idea; this is just a starter list to get you going. I recall helping my kids to make their own deck of cards with masterpieces cut out of old books from the Good Will to play Go Fish. There are unlimited tutorials on the Internet that are fun to watch. Try watching Art Attack on YouTube, then go outside and give it a shot.

    There art camps for kids that centre on art, including, of course, music. Instead of birthday gifts, relatives or grandparents might fund such a camp or lessons, if the child shows interest.

    Imagine your son or daughter with a collection of Artist cards including stats that are as valued as a baseball card collection.

    The Internet is incredible but the local library is where the fun really happens. Sign out biographies and talk about the lives of artists and the dramas surrounding them culturally (or access some fun videos, like this one about Picasso and Van Gogh).

    Dress up as a particular favorite for Halloween, or better yet have a party where everyone chooses an artist to mimic.

    This is not so much about turning your kids into artists as it is about turning your kids on to the world of art and design. 

    In my view if the creative seed is not there it’s next to impossible to grow it. However having a working knowledge and historical perspective of art propels us into critical thinking, not just in art but in all areas.  Simply put, it helps us develop intelligence. We need our children to possess the intellectual appreciation for beauty. Art is the original source of this. It should be a fundamental part of family life and early childhood education.


    __________

    by Maggie Broda
    www.maggiebroda.com
    @5novas on twitter, facebook.com/maggie.broda
    maggie@thesocialartmovement.com

     

  5. Takenori Kikuta, aka bamboo (website)

    My work is derived form the inner soul of the individual, and its hope for equality. Adults around me looked down on me when I was was young, calling me rebel and gangster. I was judged for what I wore and how I looked on the outside. I was hurt. I was angry. I started painting to absorb the negatives.

    What I spend most of my time on while painting is the undercoating. Undercoating is not seen on the outside, yet it is what defines the painting. It determines the next ten years or even a hundred years of that painting. Without a careful undercoating, paintings will be ruined sooner or later. Colors will fade away eventually. 

    A strong, patiently done undercoating is like the inner strength of a person. It defines how “strong” the painting can be in front of cold weather, or a burning heat. This strength cannot be judged from the look on the outside, just like me when I was a kid.

    My art is a mixture of graffiti and realism. The weight between the two varies depending on circumstances and what client asks for - sometimes serious, sometimes funny. But it all comes from Me. Ultimately, I want my art to appeal to all generations, old and young, rich and poor, professional artists and amateur painters. Because my beginings were not easy. I hope you too will enjoy my Art.

     


  6. How to Promote Your Art by Promoting Yourself

    From our series on ART MARKETING


    image

    There are many obstacles independent artists face when trying to start their careers and showcase their talents to the world. The market is very competitive, and finding exposure for their work becomes one of the biggest challenges.

    So, as an artist, what should you do to increase your exposure in order to greaten chances at success? As we argue in previous blogs, the key word here is YOUR exposure, not that of the art that you spend your life working one. Why? Because you are your brand.

    Here are 4 tips from skinnyartist.com that independent artists should use to maximize their exposure at little to no cost.

    1. Create your own personal website

    You want to make sure that you have your own website set up to showcase your work. More importantly, remember to take advantage of all the social media platforms out there, such as Facebook, Twitter, Behance, Tumblr, Deviant Art, and Instagram. Artists should always keep in mind that these platforms aren’t only for you to reach out to potential buyers but also for business professionals or buyers to reach out to you for various opportunities. There are always companies out there that love to support local or independent artists.

    2. Network with the local art community

    Artists should always be on the lookout for local art events. Bring your business cards and go to these events, and network! People love to talk to others that share the same passion as they do. You will be amazed by how many fellow artists and potential buyers there are who will like to hear your story and connect with you. Talk to them and remember to send them a follow-up email after you collect their business cards.

    3. Connect with businesses

    There are many businesses in the community that want to position themselves as supporters of local artists and patrons of the arts. It is crucial for artists to connect with businesses and business professionals for more opportunities to showcase their work. Go out and reach out to them, and sell them on your engaging story and motivations for your work. Everybody loves a story, and artists always have great stories to tell. Even if some businesses don’t currently support art, use it as an opportunity to sell them on the benefits that they can gain by supporting a local artist. Try to find a strategy that gets in line with their branding, perhaps, or helps them realize how much good art can do for their business and their local community. Who can say no to that?

    4. Reach out to charities

    Charities are the place that is most unlikely to turn down people’s request so go ahead and take advantage of it! Go to them in person and donate your art work for more exposure. Charities also tend to have numerous connections with business people, so also remember to visit frequently and build connections.

    Promoting your art is all about selling yourself. There are millions of talented artists out there, but what separates you from them is the personal qualities that YOU possess. So remember to always go out there and network and build personal connections, and tell your story. People don’t want to support a piece of art, no matter how good; they want to support the people who they want to see succeed.

    __________

    By Charles Li
    charles@thesocialartmovement.com

     


  7. Tactical Urbanism - Art Sneaks Up on the City

    From our series on APPRECIATING ART


    The warm weather is finally here to stay so I’ve been out walking my dog and thinking a lot about Tactical Urbanism. I found the simplest definition of tactical urbanism on the internet, “a small urban intervention”, by one or more citizens who wish to bring about local improvements. An example would be planting a butterfly garden in a weedy vacant lot. From an art perspective street graffiti might qualify but that is more akin to “guerrilla urbanism” because the graffiti may not be considered an improvement by everyone.

    Whether tactical or guerilla the shared outcome is “DIY spatial practices” for art. And the significant word at play here is “tactical”. Letting us know it has had some careful thought applied to it and by design is meant to bring about a better environment for the greater good of the community. It is, however, not officially approved by a specific authority such as a city council, nor does it follow any code for health and safety.

    Still, it could be a graffiti artist but with fewer tattoos and piercings, more Birkenstocks, and a bubble tea with some friends from the birthing centre getting involved in a Yarn Bombing.

    Have you seen any of the Yarn Bombs? Or Yarn Storms. If you spot a tree or lamppost with a colourful knitted sort of sweater on it you know what I’m talking about. Not tied on, mind you, but lovingly knitted in place.  It’s a bit like seeing a Banksy. This is part of what I feel is a movement to get out into the city and show a caring mindset to the location. Not permanent, but still illegal in reality, though no one has ever been charged with anything.

    Good thing or bad? I love it. Street Graffiti is an accepted even sought after art form  and just the beginning. We need to add more ways to place art everywhere in the urban neighborhoods. 

    Some months ago an organization called Bank on Art selected a painting from a series I created titled, Beautigraph, to be used as a  screen saver for bank machines worldwide. It seems to me that placing original artwork in novel places was a great idea and I began to imagine lists of other unusual places for art.

    How can art become more integrated with this trend? Social media inspired the flash mob. What might be the artist’s version of that?

    A call out to: choose a colour, bring a large brush, and meet in the AGO parking lot to paint a masterpiece on the asphalt. Would that work?  Artists using chalk to create illustrations on the street who get paid by the city.  That would be nice.

    Beautigraph title: The History of Behaviourism

     

    Tactical Urbanism could mean we would see park benches, picnic tables, and even fire hydrants as works of art. A subway train could become a gallery where artists might show their work digitally and along with the ads above the seats with poetry to read. Very soothing during a long commutes.

    Imagine putting and end to urban eyesores by having artists transform them into objects of beauty. Yes, more art is needed and always will be. I’d love to read your ideas so give it some thought next time you are out enjoying our great city and let me know what you come up with.


    __________

    by Maggie Broda
    www.maggiebroda.com
    @5novas on twitter, facebook.com/maggie.broda
    maggie@thesocialartmovement.com

     


  8. Digital Painting - The New Age of Digital Art

    From our series on APPRECIATING ART


    Image Source

    This is the first piece from a series of articles entitled The New Age of Visual Art. In this series, I will expose readers to the modern era of art – one that encompasses technology. 

    For centuries, humans have created artwork on traditional woven canvases with traditional tools such as paint brushes and pencils – but in the 21st century it’s all about using technology to improve the efficiency of activities. Thus, digital painting was created.

    Digital painting is the process of creating art on digital tools (i.e. computers) on virtual canvases. Software such as Photoshop, Open Canvas and SAI Painter is often used to facilitate the creation of artwork. Many digital artists use a pressure-sensitive pad and pen – formally called a “tablet” – to draw on computers.

    Painting of an apple by Winnster

    Why draw digitally? There are many advantages to using a tablet and creating art on a computer. There’s the environmental factor – digital artists do not consume as many natural resources because they do not need cotton for canvases, animal hairs for the bristles of a brush or wood for easels. Also, the creation of digital art is generally easier than traditional work because there are digital tools such as the “undo” function and the eraser tool. Lastly – there’s the spatial factor. Digital painters do not need to store paints, new canvasses, completed work and painting tools. They also do not need to clean up messes or dirty brushes after making art.

    Despite the evident advantages of digital art, traditional art still remains a dominant form of art today. There is an irreplaceable charm to being able to view the details of every brush stroke that only traditional forms of art can produce.


    __________

    by Winnie Lao
    winnster.deviantart.com
    winnie@thesocialartmovement.com

     


  9. I find courageous people both intriguing and intellectually interesting but most important I admire the courage required to swim in the deep end and to expose oneself in a world of surface dwellers hiding behind pretence…you must be brave to be artistic, no?
    — Bobbie Pahl (facebook.com/BobbiePahl)
     

  10. Jody Poehl (store, website, facebook, twitter) & SylviaM. (store, website, facebook)

    Collaboration paintings by Jody and Sylvia

    Our goal is to illuminate our thoughts and impressions with surreal images. Using a symbolist approach for a wider range of interpretations, and depicting man and nature’s relationship, our intentions are to provide enough information for the viewer to construct their own meaning. The works are substantial and quite different from the ones we produce alone. We combine our ideas and perceptions…the end result is something neither of us would have imagined alone.

    We have been painting collaborations for almost a year now. We met on Facebook and quickly became friends. Shortly after that we began painting collaborations together. One of us - Sylvia - lives in the Eastern United States, while the other - Jody - lives in the West. We have never met in person, and yet we continue working together.